Monthly Archives: October 2008

Decision Driven® Information Architecture

Many of my previous posts have described the relationships among various types of knowledge: decisions, criteria, alternatives, requirements, risks, plans, etc.  There’s method (actually science) to my madness; here’s the Decision Driven® Information Architecture that I believe illustrates how decisions … Continue reading

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Situation patterns

Your job will typically fit into one of 3 patterns (roles, functions): Create: Innovate and define strategy, capabilities and solutions. Implement: Translate strategy, capabilities and solutions into reality. Operate: Manage, deliver, perform or support the stuff conceived and deployed by the other … Continue reading

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Failure to leverage decision patterns

“Manage Decisions across Domains” is the fifth process within my Decision Driven® methods engine.  That’s really consultant/nerd-speak for “Use decision patterns, dummy!” and “Never make a decision from scratch!”   Decisions patterns are a precious form of intellectual property, but are often … Continue reading

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Failure to manage decisions over time

Every decision has a time-context (planning horizon) that’s important to understand.  Even though decisions are fundamental questions/issues that demand an answer/solution (and in a sense, last forever), their alternatives (answers, solutions) have a limited “good-for” period in which they create … Continue reading

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Failure to manage decision consequences

Everyone believes that decisions have consequences, but many fail to proactively manage them.  You can make a great decision, select a great alternative and still fail during execution.  Here are a few examples of common “failure to follow-through” decision faults: Next … Continue reading

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Common decision analysis errors

Yesterday I highlighted some common mistakes associated with failure to proactively identify and plan your decisions before diving into decision analysis.  Even if you have correctly focused on a high-priority, well-framed decision (successfully answered the “What do we need to … Continue reading

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Decision faults: failure to proactively plan your decisions

In my October 10, 2008 post, I introduced my belief that all faults are decision faults.  Over the years, I’ve seen quite a variety of bad decision practices that lead to failure.  Here are some decision faults that I lump … Continue reading

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